Study: Effects of replacing sugar-sweetened beverages with no-sugar alternatives

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Can replacing sugar-sweetened beverages with either sugar-free or unsweetened beverages decrease heart health risk factors, prevent weight gain, and reduce preferences for sweet tastes?

That’s the question a group of researchers, including David Ludwig, MD, set out to answer in a recently published trial:

Journal of the American Heart Association: Effects of sugar‐sweetened, artificially sweetened, and unsweetened beverages on cardiometabolic risk factors, body composition, and sweet taste preference: a randomized controlled trial read more

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Ketones and low carb in the time of Covid-19: Helpful or harmful speculation?

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Is there solid evidence that eating low carb or having circulating ketones might be able to help prevent or fight a Covid-19 infection?

No, not yet. For now, it’s completely speculative.

Is it too soon to be sharing hypotheses and opinions? That’s being debated.

In fact, at Diet Doctor, our team has been discussing how best to cover new Covid-19 journal publications, especially as it applies to the risk factors of diabetes, insulin resistance, obesity, hypertension, and metabolic syndrome. read more

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New book: well-raised meat is good for you, the animals, and the planet

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Are you conflicted about whether you should eat plenty of meat and animal products on your low-carb diet? Do you worry about the potential environmental or ethical issues, even if your health is visibly improving?

A new, engaging, and well-researched book will help you put your worries to rest and chart a healthy, conscientious way forward.

The new book, Sacred Cow: The case for (better) meat, was released July 14. It’s a thoughtful and in-depth examination of the nutritional, environmental and ethical controversies surrounding meat in the modern world. read more

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BMJ editorial: Endorse low carb for COVID-19 prevention

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A short but persuasive editorial in British Medical Journal is urging governments and policy makers to endorse the low-carb diet as a way to reduce the risk of serious complications from coronavirus infection.

Written by Australian science writer MaryAnne Demasi, PhD, who is deputy director of the Institute for Scientific Freedom, the editorial notes that statistics to date show patients with metabolic syndrome have worse outcomes:

the two most common underlying health conditions associated with COVID-19 infections are cardiovascular disease (32%) and diabetes (30%);
hospitalizations are six times higher among patients with a reported underlying condition (45.4%) than those without reported underlying conditions (7.6%);
deaths are 12 times higher among patients with reported underlying conditions (19.5%) compared to those without reported underlying conditions (1.6%);
two-thirds of people in the UK who have fallen seriously ill with COVID-19 have been overweight or obese and 99% of deaths in Italy have been in patients with pre-existing conditions, such as hypertension, diabetes, and heart disease. read more

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A changing landscape for low-carb diets

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How do you know when a paradigm has shifted?

You don’t, really. Revolutionary changes in science and culture usually don’t happen in one fell swoop. Changes are incremental and uneven, and progress comes in fits and starts.

Germ theory, which holds that diseases are caused by microorganisms invading the body, began to take form long before scientist Louis Pasteur’s experiments convinced many of his peers in the late 1850s to take it seriously.

But even Pasteur’s experiments were not as definitive as we now think of them. At the time, he was applauded for disproving the theory of evolution, along with that of “spontaneous generation,” a body of thought formed upon the basis that living things could emerge from objects such decaying food. read more

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ProPublica: Crusading cardiologist aims to prevent diabetic amputations

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Right now in the US, more than 130,000 limb amputations from diabetes occur each year, the majority among low-income and under-insured Americans.

African American patients lose limbs at triple the rate of other groups.

These are some of the deeply disturbing statistics presented in a moving and exceptionally researched feature published recently by ProPublica, an independent, non-profit newsroom that produces investigative journalism in the public interest.

Propublica: The Black American amputation epidemic read more

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Wild Speculation: Who’s Going to Replace Jeremy Kipp at Northwestern?

By Braden Keith on SwimSwam

Entering the 2020-2021 offseason, there was just one NCAA ‘‘ Power 5 ‘conference head training position offered in swimming &&diving. That was the USC task, which on Tuesday the school validated would be filled by Northwestern head coach Jeremy Kipp .

Overall, this is going to be a peaceful offseason as compared to the last couple, mainly since of the unpredictability developed by the coronavirus, however there will be at least a bit of a carousel impact as coaches transfer to complete various areas. read more

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Prepare Your Freezer: 100-Calorie Boozy Popsicles Are Back at Costco

Quick, make room in your freezer. Costco is bringing back their 100-calorie boozy popsicles, and you’re going to need all the shelf space you can get. 

Slim Chiller‘s boozy ice pops “Skinny Freezers,” which contain only 100 calories and 8 percent alcohol per pop, are back in stock at Costco to the delight of many, Delish reports. The return of the beloved pops was discovered on an Instagram account called the Costco Connoisseur, which posted a spotting last week. “Available at Costcos in: Oregon, Texas, & Virginia,” they said. read more

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Top 10 NutritionFacts.org Videos in 2019

NutritionFacts.org occurs from my yearly evaluation of the medical literature. With the assistance of a group of numerous volunteers, we churned through 10s of countless documents released in the peer-reviewed clinical nutrition literature and are increase to break brand-new records in 2020. How do I select which research studies to highlight? In basic, I make every effort to concentrate on the most cutting-edge, intriguing, and beneficial findings; however which subjects resonate the most? The useful ones, providing cooking or shopping suggestions? Or those that dissect the research studies behind the headings? Perhaps it’s the geeky science ones checking out the incredibly unusual world of human biology? As you can see from the listed below list, the response appears to be a little bit of all of the above: read more

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Weekly Link Love — Episode 55

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